Dating duraglas bottles asp onupdating

In 1941, the United States of America formally entered World War II on both the Pacific and European fronts.Resources became limited as many industries focused on manufacturing supplies to support the war effort.What first led me down this path of discovery was a small piece of glass I found washed up on my local creek with the word “where the surface of the hot, just produced bottles, were sprayed on the body, shoulder, and neck (not base or the top of the finish) with a stannic chloride (Tin (IV) chloride) vapor that allowed the tin to bond to the outer surface providing scratch resistance and durability to the bottles." (Lindsey, B.) Though this process is still in use today, the word was embossed on bottles only between 1940 and the mid-1950s (Lindsey, B).Therefore the piece of glass I found was manufactured using this process somewhere in that time frame.As a conservation measure during the war, the amount of glass used for many bottle types was reduced. The number in that picture could either be a 6 for the plant code, meaning it was made in Charleston, West Virginia, a plant that was in operation from 1930 - 1963 (Society for Historical Archaeology) or it could be a year code of 9. They axed the diamond, and instead were left with a simple I inside of an O (see pictures to the right and below).You can't really tell from the picture, but the green glass in Exhibit C is quite thick, thicker than anything we would see today, which leads me to believe that the glass was indeed manufactured in 1939, and has been sitting in the creek ever since, waiting for me to find it. If it is a year code, the thickness of the glass and the lack of a period after the 9 suggests a manufacturing date of 1939. The general trend, however, remained the same with the plant code on the left of the symbol, and a date code to the right.Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola didn't always adhere to the Owens-Illinois policies, and often had their dates on the heel, and not the bottom, of the glass.(Society for Historical Archaeology) However, what we do know is that Pepsi and Coke now come in plastic bottles or aluminum cans.

Each glass making company has their own method of labeling their products.an A may mean soda bottle, etc.) In other words, they're not very useful for our purposes.The number on the right is our year code and what we are most interested in. In conjunction with the relative dates of the symbol, we know that the 9 could either stand for 1939 or 1949 (1959 is possible, but very unlikely).Now, I know from the use of the symbol on the glass that both pieces pre-date the mid-1950s, but is there a way to narrow that down? The general rule when dating glass with the O-I symbol is the number to the left of the symbol is the plant code, and to the right of the symbol lies the date code.Other numbers, such as the 7 in Exhibit C, are specific to the production plant, and letters, such as the A in Exhibit E, usually stand for the glass model (e.g.By the time 1940 came along, the company realized year codes were beginning to repeat, so in the 40's they implemented adding a period after the date code to indicate years 1940 -1949.

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